How ICC Became INEFFABLE

 Luka Sabbat for ICC Spring/Summer 14

Luka Sabbat for ICC Spring/Summer 14

In 2014, I started Ineffable Clothing Company–ICC for short. My first three tees were trash. I'm talking clipart thrown onto a Gildan blank. As a result, we're only gonna focus on what happened after that. In the Spring of 2014, I started using "ICC" in the Canterbury font as the brand's logo and printed a run of 24 hockey jerseys with the logo printed in 3M vinyl the chest. The jerseys were CCM blanks that I ordered from a hockey website and then I took them to a printer in NYC that I found on Google. At the time, I was friends with Luka Sabbat so I hit him up to see if he'd be down to model them. He was with it and I believe we shot the next day. That week I bought my first camera, a Nikon D3200 so I shot the lookbook myself on auto since I hadn't figured out how to use it yet. A friend of mine showed up to the shoot with another model, Walter Pearce, who was shooting for brands like HBA at the time. He asked if I had another jersey, which I did so the lookbook ended up being him and Luka together. I guess they knew each other previously. 

icc-streetwear-14.jpg

The following season I released my first collection. It included a bomber jacket with the wifi symbol on the back in three colors, a fishtail parka with “The Youth Love Ignorance” printed on the back, the infamous “Suburbs Suck” shirt, and a sublimated shirt with a painting of a girl’s face on the front. This was the first time the brand started to gain some traction. The wifi bomber and “Suburbs Suck” shirt got a lot of attention on Instagram (this was before Instagram fucked up the algorithm).  All of the designs in this collection were made-to-order, so I wasn’t sitting on any inventory–I got them made locally one-by-one as each order came in. 

The following February I was able to give Kanye West the fishtail parka as he was leaving the Adidas offices in NYC. TMZ captured it all on film and I ended up getting some big press as a result, even though Kanye was never seen wearing the jacket in public. My favorite press that was a result of this was MTV calling me “the future of fashion.” 

Spring/Summer 2015 was my first time getting a collection manufactured overseas. I only purchased inventory in the graphic tees and the rest of the pieces were still available on a made-to-order basis. This was while I was working at SlamxHype, which at the time was a prominent streetwear blog based in NYC. For this lookbook I pooled all of my resources: I shot the lookbook in the SlamxHype photo studio, the photographer was SlamxHype’s full-time photographer, and I was also able to get another writer from the site to post coverage of my collection.

The collection after that was my last collection under the alias, “ICC.” It was a full cut-and-sew collection consisting of french terry zip-off joggers, french terry long sleeves, a twill bomber jacket with a 3M print on the back, and a nylon fishtail parka. Saleswise, this was my first time successfully moving a good amount of units. Even though the pieces came out flawless, I was sitting on designs that were much more sophisticated, but my manufacturer at the time wasn’t able to produce them.

 ICC Fall/Winter 2015

ICC Fall/Winter 2015

In the meantime, I started sampling with other factories. The first complex design I sampled was the flannel denim jacket, which didn’t end up releasing until Fall/Winter 2016. Spring/Summer 2016 was on the horizon and I had an entire collection designed that I didn’t know how to get produced. I remember one night I couldn’t fall asleep and I sent a frantic e-mail to the same factory that I sampled the denim jacket with asking if they could produce the styles I had designed. Sure enough, they said they could, and about a month later I received my first round of samples. They weren’t perfect, but they were a huge step in the right direction. After the next round of sampling, I felt that everything was perfect–the designs were sophisticated, the quality unmatched, and the entire collection merchandised well. I decided to change all the branding to “INEFFABLE,” as opposed to “ICC,” in order to represent a new chapter for the brand. INEFFABLE has been rooted in my designs since I was in eighth grade, but only recently have I felt content with everything I’ve been putting out.